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NASC

The European Arabidopsis Stock Centre

Teaching kits for Arabidopsis

Donated by

  • Maarten Koornneef Laboratory of Genetics, Plant Sciences Group, Wageningen University
  • John Bowman Department of Plant Biology, College of Biological Sciences, University of California, Davis
  • Alan M. Jones Department of Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Amber Vogel Morehead Planetarium and Science Center (MPSC) Annex, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Justin Borevitz Department of Ecology and Evolution, Division of Biological Sciences , University of Chicago
  • Chris Somerville Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution of Washington
  • Shauna Somerville Department of Plant Biology, The Carnegie Institution of Washington
  • Jian-Kang Zhu Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Riverside
  • Ruth Finkelstein Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, College of Letters and Science, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Carrie Schneider Monsanto USA, Monsanto
  • Jan Zeevaart MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory, College of Natural Science, Michigan State University
  • Sarah Hake The Plant Gene Expression Center
  • Allan Shapiro Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Delaware
  • Chu Zhang Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Delaware
  • Michael Sussman Department of Biochemistry, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Emma Knee ., Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (ABRC), The Ohio State University
  • Luz Rivero ABRC, Department of Plant Cellular and Molecular Biology , College of Biological Sciences, The Ohio State University
  • Caroline Dean Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, John Innes Centre
  • Clare Lister Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, John Innes Centre
  • Susan Wessler Department of Plant Biology, Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, University of Georgia
  • Elizabeth Boedeker Centre for Plant and Life Sciences, St. Louis Community College
  • Eilene Lyons Mathematics, Science, Engineering and Technology, St. Louis Community College
  • Kim Loney Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario
  • Scott Poethig Department of Biology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania
  • Linda Robinson Department of Biology, School of Arts and Sciences, University of Pennsylvania
  • Sarah Wyatt Department of Environmental and Plant Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, Ohio University

Click here to view all 17 of these lines.

Description

Apart from the 'Plant Curiosity Kit', all of these education kits have been created by ABRC as part of their education and outreach programme. Some of them are part of specific American teaching modules but all can be followed as documentation and teaching aids are available from their website.

WARNING: Some of the kits contain transgenic material. If a kit contains transgenic material it is stated in its description. Order one of these kits only if approved to work with transgenic material.

PLEASE NOTE: If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order these kits from NASC. Click on the headings of the kits to order. Some are free of charge but others do incur a small fee.

A summary of all the teaching kits available is found in the table below. Further descriptions of each teaching kit can be found below this.

Nasc code Teaching kit description Set contents
N4004 Plant Curiosity Kit View set contents
N19982 Reconstructing the Evolution of Cauliflower and Broccoli View set contents
N19983 Same Genes, Different Fates View set contents
N19985 Play Mendel View set contents
N19986 How can Plants Tell Which Way is Up View set contents
N19987 Think Green View set contents
N19988 Life in Bloom View set contents
N19990 Promoter-Driven GUS Reporter Gene Expression View set contents
N19991 Who Turned Out The Lights? View set contents
N19992 Germination View set contents
N19994 Genetics of Inbred Arabidopsis View set contents
N19995 Transposing From The Laboratory To The Classroom View set contents
N19996 Molecular Genotyping of Arabidopsis View set contents
N19997 Expression Analysis of Light Regulated Genes View set contents
N19998 Genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana View set contents
N19999 The gps Mutants of Arabidopsis View set contents
N20000 Plant Anatomy Set View set contents



Plant Curiosity Kit

This Plant 'Curiosity' Kit (N4004) is intended to encourage students to appreciate that mutant plants are interesting. The contents are simply a mix of seeds from several strikingly different Arabidopsis mutants. These can be planted out in the school or home and will grow in a matter of weeks to show variability. They will readily produce viable seeds that can then be replanted to demonstrate inheritance.

This kit is free to schools* that are teaching biology or general science to children with these resources.
* Following very many enquiries, 'Schools' in University Departments are not included in this definition and 'children' are expected to be under the age of consent / voting age. More importantly, other stocks, notably including transgenic lines may not be included in this order.

Click here for more information about this kit, including how to grow the seeds.

The kit contains the following seeds:

Stock No. Plant Phenotype Description
NW20
Landsberg erecta Wild Type
NW30
brevipedicellus seed pods bend downwards and the stem is kinked
N31
eceriferum Plant with bright green stem
NW41
chlorina Small yellow green plant
N45
clavata Plant with bent club shaped seed pods
N64
glabra Plant with no hairs on the leaves

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Reconstructing The Evolution Of Cauliflower And Broccoli

This set of 3 stocks (N6161, NW20, N26) are used in the US teaching module "RECONSTRUCTING THE EVOLUTION OF CAULIFLOWER AND BROCCOLI".

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Same Genes, Different Fate

This set of 3 stocks (N68100, N68101 & N70000) is used in the module "Same Genes, Different Fates". The goal of this module is to introduce students to the concept of differential gene expression, a process by which cells with identical genetic information give rise to cells with different structures and functions (specialized cells). The lab portion includes the analysis of gene expression of two Arabidopsis genes: MLO9 (involved in chlorophyll production) and MLO4 (involved in root celll division) in Arabidopsis seedlings, using GUS reporter gene.

Warning:This kit contains transgenic material. Order this kit only if approved to work with transgenic material.
For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Play Mendel

This set of 4 seed stocks (NW20, NW25, N28169 & N28175) is used in the "PLAY MENDEL" module, a part of our American sister stock centre ABRC "Greening the Classroom" Teaching Modules. Students are first introduced to the causal relationship of genetic mutation and morphological variation by growing Arabidopsis plants with different genetic backgrounds ("wild type" and mutant) in their classrooms. Next, they follow and analyze inheritance and segregation of a trait (e.g. floral mutations, leaf hairs) to understand concepts central to Mendelian genetics.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



How Can Plants Tell Which Way Is Up?

This set of 2 seed stocks (N907, N210) is used to test mutant (pgm-1) and wild-type (Col) response to gravity, described in the publication "How Can Plants Tell Which Way Is Up?". The set of lab exercises described in this publication enables students to understand the basis of gravitropic response using starch synthesis mutant. It also introduces scientific concepts such as hypothesis testing and other statistical analyses.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Think Green

This set of 10 seed stocks (N70000, N76164, N28828, N22574, N28722, N6252, N3862, N21, N22, N8105) is used in the "THINK GREEN" module, a part of our American sister stock centre ABRC "Greening the Classroom" Teaching Modules. In this module, students will investigate how plant genotype and natural variation influence plant responses to environmental conditions and how this affects survival in a changing environment.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Life in Bloom

This set of 5 stocks is used in the LIFE IN BLOOM module, a part of ABRC Greening the Classroom Teaching Modules. Students will compare the germination rate of mutants defective in the early (ga1) and late (ga5) steps of gibberellic acid (GA) biosynthesis with the corresponding wild type (non-mutant), Ler, as well as comparing a mutant in GA sensing and response (gai-1). By comparing germination rates and totals in seeds grown in water or GA solution under light or dark conditions, students will gain an understanding of the requirement for GA in germination. They will also observe how supplying exogenous GA can reverse the phenotypes of some mutants, but not of others.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Promoter-Driven GUS Reporter Gene Expression

This set of 11 seed stocks (N25261, N16358, N25262, N3763, N6141, N6357, N6497, N70756, N70764, N8849) is used to demonstrate use of native promoter-driven reporter gene expression. Students will be able to observe distinct Beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression patterns determined by the promoters of 11 genes with a very well-known function. Note that CS6357 and CS16358 represent translational fusions and nine other lines all represent transcriptional fusions.

Warning:This kit contains transgenic material. Order this kit only if approved to work with transgenic material.
For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Who Turned Out The Lights?

This set of 4 stocks (NW20, N6213, N6219, N6224) is used in the "WHO TURNED OUT THE LIGHTS?" module. Students will learn how plants sense differences in their light environment through the action of photoreceptors and respond by modifying their growth and development. The set includes wild type (non-mutant) Ler seeds, phytochrome A and phytochrome B mutant seeds, and double mutant seed in which both photoreceptors are mutated in the same plant.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Germination

This set of 5 stocks (N70000, N76390, N76412, N76384, N76387) is used in the US teaching module module "Germination". These natural variants, including a lab strain and four locally adapted lines from different climates, illustrate the variation in light and temperature requirements for germination in Arabidopsis. Students will germinate seeds in light and darkness following a 3 day cold (stratification) period or without stratification an observe differences in germination in the different natural variants.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Genetics of Inbred Arabidopsis

This is a 4-8 week module for upper high school courses such as Genetics, Biotechnology, Honors or AP Biology, also well suited for undergraduate courses. Prior student background: Basic biology and genetics.
Designed as a whole-class experiment, students work in teams to understand genotypic variation among recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. Seeds are used from two parent lines, Columbia and Landsberg, as well as numerous recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed by crossing the parent lines. In a guided inquiry investigation, students sow and cultivate all the plants in the same controlled environments (to minimize variation due to environment), and monitor traits to observe genetic variation among the RILs. Protocols are provided to investigate whether given traits are continuous (quantitative) traits - the result of multiple genes, or if they are discrete traits - the result of a single gene. In addition to this guided inquiry, students may also choose other traits to investigate. Students can even propose whether a continuous trait is linked to one of the discrete traits or not. Student teams pool data with other teams in the class to analyze trends and patterns, such as identifying continuous versus discrete traits, and determining potential genetic linkages among traits. Students communicate with scientist mentors online to discuss their experiment, from generating questions to constructing evidence-based conclusions.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Transposing From The Laboratory To The Classroom

This set of 6 stocks (N67774, N67775, N67776, N67777, N67778, N67779) is used in the US teaching module "TRANSPOSING FROM THE LABORATORY TO THE CLASSROOM". The module is a modified version of a published experiment where students experience how virtual transposable elements from rice (Oryza sativa) are assayed for function in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. As part of the module, students analyze the phenotypes and genotypes of transgenic plants to determine the requirements for transposition. After mastering the skills and concepts, students participate in an authentic research project where they use computational analysis and PCR to detect transposable element insertion site polymorphism in a panel of diverse maize strains.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Molecular Genotyping of Arabidopsis

This set of 2 stocks (NW20, N290) is used in the US teaching module "Molecular Genotyping of Arabidopsis". The goal of this laboratory is to introduce students to the action of transposons, plant DNA extraction and the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to compare diploid genotypes. A transposon insertion is identified in curly leaf (clf-2) mutant and Ler wild-type is used as a control.

Warning:This kit contains transgenic material. Order this kit only if approved to work with transgenic material.
For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Expression Analysys of Light Regulated Genes

This set of 2 stocks (N6158, N39005) is used in the module "EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF LIGHT-REGULATED GENES IN THE det1-1 MUTANT". The module is based on light signaling pathways in plants, specifically Arabidopsis. Over the course of three labs, students are introduced to the techniques of RNA isolation and Reverse Transcription PCR (RT-PCR) for the purpose of analyzing differences in mRNA content of light-regulated genes between wild-type and det1-1 mutant samples. First, students are able to assess phenotypic differences between wild-type and det1-1 plants grown in the presence or absence of light. Next, through RT-PCR students gain an understanding of how mutation in one gene can cause downstream effects in signaling pathways to alter the response to light.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana

This set of 2 stocks (N70000, N6955) can be used to generate F2 plants used in the US teaching module "Genetics of Arabidopsis thaliana". In this module students use F2 plants of a dihybrid cross between gl1-1 hy4-B104 (cry1) double mutant and Col wild-type to follow the segregation of two independent traits as well as to explore the relationship between genotype and phenotype using molecular methods. Recommended for use in college-level courses.

For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



The gps Mutants of Arabidopsis

This set of 4 stocks (N2360, N67144, N67145, N67146) is used to demonstrate a range of altered responses to gravity of shoots and hypocotyls at room temperature after gravistimulation at 4C. It contains Ws wild type and gps mutants: no response (gps1), wrong way (gps2) and over achiever (gps3). GPS1 is a cytochrome P450 subunit, the identity of GPS2 and GPS3 is not known.

Warning:This kit contains transgenic material. Order this kit only if approved to work with transgenic material.
For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.



Plant Anatomy Set

This set of 8 GFP seed lines (N9210, N9217, N9244, N9245, N9247, N9249, N9251, N9266) from J. Haseloff and screened by Sarah Wyatt has been identified as a plant anatomy set for use in undergraduate / beginning graduate courses; this set includes lines expressing GFP in roots, shoots and flowers.

Warning:This kit contains transgenic material. Order this kit only if approved to work with transgenic material.
For more information see the ABRC Education and Outreach pages.
If you are NOT in the US or The Americas please order this kit from NASC.