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Leyser Hi-0 x Tsu-0 RILs

Donated by

  • Jean Dillon Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge
  • Ottoline Leyser Sainsbury Laboratory, Cambridge University
  • Rebecca Butler Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge
  • Hugo Tavares Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge
  • Maike de Jong Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge
  • Audrey McInnerney Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge
  • Urszula Kania Sainsbury Laboratory, University of Cambridge

Click here to view all 400 of these lines.

Description

Leyser Hi-0 x Tsu-0 RILs

F8 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population was generated from accessions Hi-0 and Tsu-0, which have opposite phenotypes for shoot branching plasticity in response to nitrate. Higher plasticity line Tsu-0, grown under nitrate sufficient conditions, produces more branching than those grown under nitrate deficient conditions. Lower plasticity line Hi-0 produces similar numbers of branches, regardless of nitrate supply (de Jong et al., 2019). Lines Hi-0 and Tsu-0 were selected from a set of 19 natural accessions, founders of MAGIC lines (Kover et al., 2009). The initial F1 was generated by reciprocal crossing, using each accession as both a male and a female parent. F2s were generated by selfing individuals from each reciprocal F1 cross. 200 individuals from each cross direction (400 total) were picked for further rounds of selfing. In each round, a single seed was grown to generate the next generation. We repeated this process up to generation F8 (i.e. 6 rounds of single-seed-descent selfing after the initial F2 segregating population). The direction of the cross is indicated by the RIL name, where the female parent is indicated first (for example, Hi-0xTsu-0.030 is individual 30 from a cross using Hi-0 as a female parent). For most mapping purposes, researchers can ignore the cross direction; but this information may be of interest to study epistatic interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes or segregation distortion.